An oration on the principles of liberty and independence
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An oration on the principles of liberty and independence pronounced July 4, 1808, at the request of a number of the inhabitants of the town of Dedham and its vicinity, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by Richardson, James

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Published by Printed by H. Mann in Dedham [Mass.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Fourth of July orations

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby James Richardson
SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 16076
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination16 p
Number of Pages16
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15093680M

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Liberty and equality. An oration, wherein the principles of the Declaration of Independence, are illustrated and supported, and some of the causes which may endanger the liberties of America, pointed out. Delivered, July 4 At Mount Pleasant. / By Richard Hillier. ; Published at the request of those who heard it. Hillier, Richard. Get this from a library! An oration on the principles of liberty and independence: pronounced July 4, , at the request of a number of the inhabitants of the town of Dedham and its vicinity, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence. [James Richardson]. Get this from a library! Liberty and equality An oration, wherein the principles of the Declaration of Independence, are illustrated and supported, and some of the causes which may endanger the liberties of America, pointed out. Delivered, July 4 At Mount Pleasant. [Richard Hillier].   An oration on the beauties of liberty, or The essential rights of the Americans. Delivered at the Second Baptist-Church in Boston, upon the last annual thanksgiving, Dec. 3d, [Allen, John] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. An oration on the beauties of liberty, or The essential rights of the Americans. Delivered at the Second Baptist-Church in BostonAuthor: John Allen.

Even as the war was being waged and with the outcome uncertain, intellectuals and statesmen continued to make the case for the importance of American independence. On July 4, , physician, historian, and South Carolina politician David Ramsay (–) delivered this speech, the nation’s first Fourth of July oration, in Charleston. The harm principle holds that the actions of individuals should only be limited to prevent harm to other individuals. John Stuart Mill articulated this principle in On Liberty, where he argued that "The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others." An equivalent was earlier stated in France's.   Founding principles were fine for the problems we faced at the end of the eighteenth century. However, conditions change, bringing new problems. Government must evolve to meet new challenges, and the people must be free to adapt government forms to .   Douglass believed what Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine believed: the principles of natural right held irresistible power for minds uncorrupted by interest, and freedom of speech, if properly protected, would propagate those principles throughout the world. Douglass was a strong believer in the power of speech.

  John Quincy Adams, July 4, , “An Oration Delivered before the Inhabitants of the Town of Newburyport, at their Request, on the Sixty-First Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration of Independence will be read by S. D. Porter, Esq. An Oration will be delivered by Frederick Douglass. Appropriate Speeches will be made by William C. Bloss, Esq., Rev. Ovid Miner, and Lindley Murray Moore, Esq. Music by Messrs. Clark and Edward Sperry. Mark R. Levin, nationally syndicated talk-radio host, host of LevinTV, chairman of Landmark Legal Foundation, and the host of the FOX News show Life, Liberty, & Levin, is the author of six consecutive #1 New York Times bestsellers: Liberty and Tyranny, Plunder and Deceit, Rediscovering Americanism, Ameritopia, The Liberty Amendments, and Unfreedom of the Press.   January 29 is the birthday of Thomas Paine (), the fiery rhetorician of America’s revolution whose importance was such that John Adams said: “[W]ithout the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain.”. Common Sense, first published in January , argued strongly for independence from England and was the most widely read pamphlet of the American.